Oregon has eliminated all juvenile fines and fees. Effective September 26, 2021, courts and agencies can no longer charge fees or fines to youth or families in the juvenile delinquency system. All unpaid fees and fines will be discharged on January 1, 2022. At this time, restitution obligations remain unchanged.

Research shows that juvenile fees and fines perpetuate cycles of poverty and undermine the financial and emotional well-being of youth and their families. They disproportionately harm Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and low-income families and net little or no revenue for the government entities that assess and collect them. Recognizing this, the Oregon Legislature passed Senate Bill 817 which eliminated fines and fees in the juvenile legal system and required the discharge of all outstanding debt.

Senate Bill 817

Effective September 26, 2021, Oregon Senate Bill 817 (SB 817) prohibits courts, state agencies, and local government entities from assessing fees related to Oregon Youth Authority custody, representation by counsel, electronic monitoring, probation supervision, testing, expunction, or court costs in the juvenile system. The bill also repeals the court’s authority to impose fines in delinquency proceedings. All unpaid juvenile fees and fines are considered null and void and satisfied effective January 1, 2022. SB 817 does not affect restitution obligations.

Frequently Asked Questions

Which fees/fines did SB 817 eliminate?

See SB 817 Implementation Toolkit for Agencies for a complete list of fees and fines affected by SB 817. Please note that SB 817 does not affect restitution eligibility or obligations to pay.

When does SB 817 go into effect?

SB 817 takes effect in two phases. Effective September 26, 2021, courts and agencies cannot charge fees or fines to youth or families in the juvenile delinquency system. Effective January 1, 2022, all judgements relating to juvenile fees and fines are considered null and void and satisfied.

I owe fines and fees from an old case. Do I have to pay?

Effective January 1, 2022, all judgements relating to juvenile fees and fines are considered null and void and satisfied. You do not have to pay fees or fines relating to a juvenile delinquency case after January 1, 2022.

My case was waived to adult court. Do I have to pay fees and fines?

SB 817 only applies to fees and fines related to juvenile delinquency cases. Therefore, youth who have been waived to adult court are still responsible for fees and fines. However, SB 817 eliminated support fees for youth in the custody of the Oregon Youth Authority. Therefore, families of youth who have been waived to adult court but remain in the custody of the Oregon Youth Authority (OYA) are not responsible for child support fees.

I’ve already paid my juvenile fines and fees. Am I entitled to a refund?

No. Agencies are not required to refund payments made on juvenile fines and fees.

Can my insurance be billed for treatment related to a juvenile delinquency case?

Yes. SB 817 does not impact provider fees that would typically be billed to public or private insurance.

Do I still have to pay restitution?

Yes. If you were ordered to pay restitution by the court, you must continue to make restitution payments. SB 817 does not change restitution eligibility or obligations to pay.

SB 817 Resources

SB 817 Enrolled Bill Text (2021)

This document contains the text of the enrolled Oregon Senate Bill 817.

SB 817 Implementation Toolkit for Agencies (Revised 2021)

This guide contains a list of impacted statutes and a checklist for agencies implementing SB 817.

SB 817 Community Outreach Flyer (Revised 2021)

This flyer is a resource for youth and families who were impacted by the passage of SB 817 that eliminated fees and fines imposed on youth and their families in Oregon.

SB 817 Social Media Graphic (Revised 2021)

This social media graphic is a resource for you or your organization to get the word out about the passage of SB 817, which eliminated juvenile fees and fines in Oregon.

Contact

If you were involved in the juvenile court system and have been ordered to pay fines & fees, contact Youth, Rights & Justice for more information on SB 817.

If you need more information about your juvenile court case, contact your court appointed attorney or juvenile court counselor. If you can’t remember who your attorney was, contact the juvenile court in the county in which your case was adjudicated.